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BIENNIAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Industrial Farm Colony For Women 



KINSTON, N. C. 




FOR THE TWO YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1934 



BIENNIAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Industrial Farm Colony For Women 



KINSTON, N. C. 




FOR THE TWO YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1934 



Biennial Report for 1932-33—1933-34 



PERSONNEL 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

R. F. Beasley (resigned) Monroe 

W. N. Holt Smithfield 

J. L. Becton . Wilmington 

Mrs. Mary Bennett Little Wadesboro 

Mrs. Francis D. Winston Windsor 

OFFICERS 

R. F. Beasley (resigned) Chairman 

W. N. Holt Secretary-Treasurer 

VISITING STAFF 

W. N. Holt . Board Consultant 

A. M. McCuistan, M. D. (To September 30, 1932) Visiting Physician 

Thos. Leslie Lee, M. D., F. A. G. S. (From Oct. 1, 1932). Medical Director 

J. Garves Poole, D. D. S. (To December 31, 1933) Dentist 

Geo. W. Price, D. D. S. (From January 1, 1934) Dentist 

RESIDENT STAFF 

Mrs. Marion F. Gallup (To October 31, 1932) Superintendent 

Elsa Ernst (From November 1, 1932) Superintendent and Psychologist 

Rosella Kern, R. N. Nurse and Assistant Superintendent 

Leeta W. Church Secretary and Budget Officer 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

To His Excellency, The Honorable J. C. B. Ehringhaus, 
Governor of North Carolina. 

Sir: 

I have the honor of transmitting herewith the biennial re- 
port of the State Industrial Farm Colony for Women for the 
two years ended June 30, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 
W. N. Holt 
Secretary of the Board of Directors. 



4 Biennial Report for 1932-33—1933-34 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 

To The Honorable Board of Trustees 

of the State Industrial Farm Colony for Women : 

The State Industrial Farm Colony for Women presents the 
only alternative to the city and county jails for women convicted 
of misdemeanors, and is the only State institution which pro- 
vides a constructive rehabilitation program for such women. 

All sentences to the Colony are indeterminate by law, and 
the women are subject to supervision on parole for the maximum 
period of three years from commitment. Parole is generally 
granted, according to the health and behavior progress of an 
individual, after a period of from six to eight months under 
training and medical care in the institution. A system of weekly 
merit cards is used to indicate an individual's progress in train- 
ing. An intensive health and behavior program is begun from 
the first hour the woman enters the home-like atmosphere of 
the Colony. As soon as the doctor's examination is completed 
a few days after admission, a practical household training and 
farm work program is begun. We cannot afford to waste one 
moment of these women's time at State expense. Obviously, a 
high type of adequately trained personnel is essential to carry 
on successfully a scientifically planned, high powered rehabili- 
tation program of this sort. 

At least one trained teacher-relief officer should be added to 
the resident staff of the institution. We are at present depend- 
ing on a C W A teacher to round out our training program. 

During the last biennium one hundred and seventy-four (174) 
women were admitted, and one hundred and seventy-six (176) 
women were placed on parole, an increase of seventy-five per 
cent in the number admitted, and one hundred and twenty-five 
per cent in the number paroled over and above the number of 
admittances and paroles in the previous biennium. This un- 
usually large turnover as compared to the size of the institu- 
tion means the work of the institution cannot be measured in 
terms of its average population only (see Table 2). Its work 
must be measured in terms of the number of women trained, 
paroled, and making good. 

Of the one hundred and seventy-six women paroled during 
the last biennium the large majority, as far as we have been able 
to determine, have made satisfactory community adjustments. 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 5 

Twenty-two women were recalled for a further period of train- 
ing. Nineteen of these have since been returned again to the 
community, and the majority of these also are now making good. 
In a considerable number of cases women have gone home and 
assisted in promoting higher standards of behavior in their im- 
mediate family and neighborhood. Slatternly homes have, 
through their efforts, become clean and orderly and happier. The 
children in such homes are naturally receiving better care than 
heretofore. In some cases the entire community has changed 
its attitude towards a woman and her family, following her ob- 
vious reformation and her sincere and persistent effort to make 
good in spite of marked handicaps in her environment. 

The follow-up work after a woman has been placed on parole 
is as important as her training here. It should be, in fact a con- 
tinuation of the work of the institution under community con- 
ditions. This is more desirable than prolonged institutional care 
for our type of cases. Our women are paroled in charge of the 
welfare superintendents of their respective counties, except when 
jobs are obtained for them elsewhere. The institution has also, 
in spite of its over-loaded program, and limited staff, kept in 
touch with as many parolees as possible by corespondence and 
personal visits. We have found county welfare officials most 
co-operative in spite of their own over-loaded schedules. 

There should, however, be attached to the institution at least 
one adequately trained, full-time parole officer to enable us to 
do effective follow-up work in co-operation with the county and 
State Welfare Officials, with the rapidly increasing number of 
parolees. Such an officer would be in close touch with the in- 
stitution. She would be familiar with the detailed behavior pic- 
ture presented by the woman while under training here, her per- 
sonality traits, special problems, physical conditions, and so 
forth, and therefore would be in a position to aid parolees in 
especially difficult problems of community adjustment. Such a 
follow-up program is essential in order to maintain and increase 
the efficiency of the Colony parole work. 

The most outstanding development in the work of the Colony 
during the past biennium has been that of the Medical Depart- 
ment. The former superintendent, Mrs. Marion F. Gallup, was 
fortunate in securing shortly before her departure the services 
of Dr. Thos. Leslie Lee, F. A. G. S., of Kinston, as medical di- 
rector of the institution. The progress of the medical work is 



6 Biennial Report for 1932-33—1933-34 

adequately covered in Dr. Lee's report, and fully illustrates the 
importance of this phase of the Colony work not only in itself, 
but its vital importance as a definite part of a scientifically 
planned behavior training program. To quote one rather ob- 
vious example, the so-called "lazy girls" were in many cases 
found to be suffering from hookworm, and improved both in 
behavior and attitude, as well as in general health, after treat- 
ment. 

Dr. J. Garves Poole continued his valuable dental services 
until the end of 1933, since when this work has been ably carried 
on under his successor, Dr. Geo. W. Price. The statistics given 
in the dental report add further emphasis to the close relation be- 
tween health and behavior problems. 

The amount of medical and dental work done is all the more 
remarkable when viewed in the light of our very limited appro- 
priation for medical, surgical, and dental work. It has only been 
possible because of the untiring and unselfish labors of Dr. Lee, 
Dr. Poole and Dr. Price, together with the generous gift of sev- 
eral thousand dollars' worth of gratuitous service per annum by 
Dr. Paul F. Whitaker and Dr. Vance P. Peery of the Kinston 
Medical Clinic, and the Memorial General Hospital. It is fitting 
to mention also the work of our assistant superintendent-nurse, 
Miss Rosella Kern, R. N., in rendering able support to our medi- 
cal director and dentist in the effective organization of the health 
routines of the institution. 

A study of the results of the psychometric and educational 
tests made during the past biennium as compared with those 
of the previous biennium shows that the range of intelligence 
and educational levels and the aproximate number of cases at 
each level has varied but little from year to year. The range of 
intelligence levels is still from around lower moron to slightly 
superior adult, with an approximate 60 to 65% below the 70 
I.Q., 25 to 30% between 70 and 90 I.Q., and around 10% between 
90 and 110 I.Q. The educational achievements or lack of them 
range from illteracy to around one year of college work; about 
50% have gone no further than the fourth or fifth grade. Liter- 
acy classes were held by our C W A teacher, who also had charge 
of the sewing classes and recreational program. 

Some work has been done with the Bernreuter Personality 
Inventory and the Pressey X-0 Tests, but it has not been possible 
to give adquate time to the fullest development of the psychologi- 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 7 

cal work that had been hoped for. We look to the future to help 
us to work out these problems. 

We are indebted to Dr. Harry W. Crane, Director of the Di- 
vision of Mental Hygiene of the State Board of Welfare, for his 
helpful advice and co-operation in the study of special cases ; and 
to Professor C. H. Allen of Western Carolina Teachers' College 
for a week's service in testing. 

During the first year of the biennium, ^extension courses for 
teachers were given at the Colony in Abnormal Psychology and 
Problems in Mental Hygiene, for which graduate and under- 
graduate credit were granted by the Department of Psychology 
of the University of North Carolina. Specially selected case data 
from the Colony files (with identities carefully disguised) were 
used to illustrate the subject matter of the lectures, and a study 
made of the more important mechanisms of behavior underlying 
various types of delinquencies, with special emphasis on pre- 
ventive mental hygiene measures. It is hoped that the care- 
fully gathered and recorded medical, psychological, and other 
data in our files may eventually be of use to research workers in 
certain closely allied fields of medicine, sociology, psychology, 
and education. A state institution such as the Farm Colony, 
properly planned and equipped, contains a wealth of laboratory 
material which should be made accessible to research students 
and practical workers in the various fields of human engineering 
and development. 

In our sewing room an interesting and valuable project was 
turned out last January. Under the direction of Miss Ethel R. 
Tipton of Richmond, Virginia, Special Instructress, whose ser- 
vices, together with the loan of eight sewing machines were 
donated by the Singer Sewing Machine Co. The women were 
taught the care and use of the machines and then applied their 
knowledge and skill to practical dress making. Each woman 
made at least one dress to fit herself. Eighteen women com- 
pleted the course satisfactorily, twelve attaining a grade of 
"excellent." Our regular classes in sewing which developed 
from this project are at present hampered, as the institution 
owns only three wornout sewing machines. 

On our farm the total acreage under cultivation has been 
increased during the past biennium from forty to eighty acres. 
Twenty-five acres of this land was cleared by the C W A and 
planted in corn to provide feed for our stock. Our hogs and 



8 Biennial Report for 1932-33—1933-34 

chickens have prospered. A new laying house has been built 
by the farm director. Our present season gives the promise of 
being a very good one, and we hope thereby to supply all the veg- 
etables necessary for our tables and much of the feed for the 
stock. 

We wish to express our appreciation to the Board of Directors 
for their sympathetic attitude towards the ideals we are en- 
deavoring to put into # practice, and especially to Mr. W. N. Holt, 
Secretary and Treasurer and Board Consultant, for his helpful- 
ness at all times ; to the counties and cities of the State for their 
splendid co-operation and aid through their welfare depart- 
ments ; to the officials of the State Board of Charities and Pub- 
lic Welfare for their continued encouragement ; to the Sociology, 
Psychology, and Extension Departments of the University of 
North Carolina and the State Department of Education, for 
their keen interest in and support of our work ; to the staff of the 
Kinston Medical Clinic and the Memorial General Hospital, 
especially to Dr. Paul F. Whitaker and Dr. Vance P. Peery, for 
their, continued generosity and invaluable service to the women 
of the Colony; to our good next-door neighbors, Dr. Register 
and the staff of the Caswell Training School, for the many 
courtesies extended and the supply of cane seed and potatoes 
from their surplus stores ; to the Pastors of the Kinston churches, 
who have so faithfully carried on the work of our Sunday ser- 
vices throughout the period ; to the Women's Guild of the Epis- 
copal Church, for the donation of Testaments as individual gifts 
to our women; to the many kind friends in Kinston and else- 
where for their services and donations of magazines, fruit, and 
supplies especially at Christmas time. 

To our indefatigable secretary, budget officer, and parole 
worker, Miss Leeta W. Church, who has been awarded an 
FERA scholarship at the University of North Carolina ; to our 
farm director, housemothers, and other staff members for their 
unselfish devotion to duty and to the best interests of the women 
under their care, our thanks are also due. 

Elsa Ernst, Superintendent. 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 
medical statistics 

For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1933 and 1934 



Admissions per year 

Complete physical examinations . 



Wassermann examinations of admissions 

Additional Wassermann examinations (rechecks) . 

Total Wassermann examination 

Positive syphilitic cases 

Syphilitic treatments: 

Intravenous — Neoarsphenamin 

Intramuscular — Thio-bismol 

Intramuscular — Mercurosal 

Total number syphilitic treatments 



Gonorrheal examinations of admissions: 

Vaginal smears 

Urethral smears 

Additional gonorrheal examinations (rechecks): 

Vaginal smears 

Urethral smears . 

Total number gonorrheal examinations 

Positive gonorrheal cases 

Vaginal douches for gonorrhea 



Minor treatments 

Stool examinations 

Hookworm treatments 

Other intestinal parasite treatments . 

Metabolisms 

Thyroid treatments 

Clinical patients 

Visits made by doctor 



Major operations . 
Minor operations . 



Average weight on admission., 

Average weight on dismissal 

Average weight of hookworm patients on admission 

Average weight of hookworm patients on dismissal (after treatment) . 



Typhoid vaccinations.. 
Smallpox vaccinations. 



YEARS ENDED 



June 30, 1933 



88 

88 
108 
196 

33 



663 



134 

134 

222 

62 

2,440 

3,188 

90 

21 

4 

48 

7 

146 

45 

4 
10 



125 lbs. 
134 lbs. 
120 lbs. 
131 lbs. 

264 



June 30, 1934 



86 
86 

86 
138 
224 

25 

313 

214 

36 

563 



86 
86 

300 

300 

386 

48 

6,044 

3,909 
159 

70 

70 

88 

27 
365 

57 

1 

6 

120 lbs. 
130 lbs. 
118 lbs. 
139 lbs. 

258 
80 



10 Biennial Report for 1932-33—1933-34 

REPORT OF MEDICAL DIRECTOR 

We feel the foregoing statistical report is in need of brief explana- 
tion in order that it may be fully appreciated. 

One of the policies of the institution is based upon the axiom, "A 
healthy body predisposes to a healthy mind." Your medical director has 
endeavored at all times to improve the general physical condition of each 
new inmate. In this we feel that with the limited means at hand, both 
financial and physical, we have accomplished much. 

During the past biennium there have been one hundred and seventy- 
four (174) new admissions. Each new woman is isolated until seen by 
the medical director. This we do in order to prevent epidemics of scabies 
(itch), pediculosis, and other infectious diseases. As soon as possible a 
complete physical examination is done. This includes examination of the 
head, heart, lungs, abdomen, pelvis (bimanual and speculum), extremities 
and back. The laboratory examination consists of a complete blood count, 
urinalysis, basal metabolic rate, stool examination, vaginal and urethral 
smears, and Wassermann test. Each new inmate is vaccinated against 
smallpox and typhoid fever, regardless of whether they have been vac- 
cinated before or not. It is interesting to note that we have obtained al- 
most forty per cent (40%) takes in the smallpox vaccination. 

Another significant fact is the percentage of those women infected 
with veneral disease. Of the one hundred and seventy-four (174) women 
admited, fifty-eight (58) or thirty-nine per cent (39%) were infected with 
syphilis in one of its stages; one hundred and ten (110) or sixty-two per 
cent (62%) were infected with gonorrhea. The figures are amazing, as 
over one-third had syphilis and over one-half had gonorrhea. 

The number women suffering from anemia has been approximately 
sixty-five per cent (65%). We take as anemia a hemoglobin of seventy 
per cent. (70%) or under, and under 3,500,000 red cells. Twenty-four 
per cent (24%) have been found to have hookworm infection. From the 
percentage above it is easily seen that the women do not come to us in a 
healthy condition. Some of the above conditions alone are capable of pro- 
ducing such delinquencies as these women are convicted of. It is remark- 
able to see these women improve under proper treatment and management. 
Their mental attitude toward the institution entirely changes during the 
first month in nearly all. 

The general health at the institution has been good. There have been 
no major outbreaks of disease. We did not have a single case of "Devil's 
Grippe" and we have not had a case of influenza in the institution. Of 
this record we are justly proud. 

There has been one institutional death during the past two years. The 
death was due to gonorrheal endocarditis. These cases are nearly one 
hundred per cent (100%) fatal. She had all the aid medicine could give 
by medicines, hospitalization, transfusions, etc. Consultations were held 
with other physicians. 

There have been five (5) major operations performed by the medical 
director. These were for acute appendicitis, pelvic disorders and sterili- 
zation operations. There were no deaths. 

The buildings have been visited from time to time and have always 
been found in good sanitary condition. The water supply has been tested 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



11 



for its purity by the State Laboratory of Hygiene and has always been 
reported with no harmful ingredients. 

The institution and medical director wish to acknowledge the services 
of Dr. Vance P. Peery, in Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat; Dr. Paul F. Whit- 
aker, in Internal Medicine, and for the generous offer of his private lab- 
oratory without charge. 

In conclusion, we feel that we have done more than could be expected 
with the financial and physical means. Without co-operation between all 
departments of the institution it could not have been done. The medical 
director wishes to extend his sincere thanks to the heads of the various 
departments, and the associates, for their hearty co-operation to maintain 
the axiom, "A healthy body predisposes to a healthy mind." 

Thos. Leslie Lee, M. D., F. A. G. S. 

Medical Director. 



DENTAL STATISTICS 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1933 and 1934 



Number of admissions for year 

Number of dental examinations of admissions 

Number showing positive Vincent's infection, 

Number negative for Vincent's infection 

Number of Vincent's tests, recheck 

Total number of tests made for Vincent's Angina 

Number of Vincent's treatments given 

Number positive, both syphilis and Vincent's Angina 

Number of pyorrhea cases 

Number of cavities of decay 

Number of extractions 

Number of patient^howing no cavities 

Number of partially erupted 3rd molars 

Number of dental plates made... 

Total number of patients treated 

Total number visits by dentist 

Average number of patients seen each visit 



YEARS ENDED 



June 30, 1933 



88 



42 


57 


46 


28 


86 


152 


174 


237 


206 


283 


14 


17 


25 


27 


399 


270 


80 


50 


14 


13 


15 


14 


2 


2 


493 


714 


50 


51 


10 


14 



June 30, 1934 



86 



About fifty per cent (50%) of the patients seen had never had dental 
care before coming to the Colony. 

The addition of a small amount of dental equipment would enable us, 
with very little outlay, to take care of a large number of emergency fillings, 
and thereby save teeth which would mean much to future health. 

It also is interesting to note that fifty-seven per cent (57%) of the 
cases seen showed Vincent's infection. 

J. Garves Poole, D. D. S., 

Geo. W. Price, D. D. S. 



12 



Biennial Report for 1932-33—1933-34 



TABLE NO. 1 
GENERAL INFORMATION 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1933 and 1934 



1. Date of opening April 3, 1929 

2. 



Plant: 

Buildings. -. 
488 Acres. . 
Equipment. 



91,647.72 

4,986.08 

12,813.73 



Total Value $ 109,447.53 




3. Officers and employees in service at end of year: 

Superintendent 

Secretary 

Assistant superintendent 

Kitchen matron 

House mother, Building A 

House mother, Building B 

Farm matron 

Farm director 

Farm hands 



Total. 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



13 



TABLE NO. 2 
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION 





YEARS 


ENDED 




June 30, 1933 


June 30, 1934 


Number on Books First of Year: 

1. In institution 


46 

78 


43 


2. In custody outside institution 


163 






3. Total number first of year (sum of items 1 and 2) _ . . 


124 

82 


206 


Admissions During Year: 

4. From courts 


70 


5 . Transferred from other institutions 




6. Parole violaters returned _ 


6 
9 


16 


7. Escapees returned . . ... 


14 


8. Others (returned for care or training) . . 


3 








9. Total admissions (sum of items 4 to 8 inclusive) ' 


97 


103 






10. Sum of items 3 and 9-. 


221 


309 






Separations During Year: 
11. Paroled: 

1st parole.. _ 


83 


67 


2nd parole '. 


18 


12. Escaped from institution 


12 


14 


13. Escaped while outside institution 




14. Died 


1 
1 
3 




15 . Transferred to other institutions 




16. Others (returned from care or training) . 


5 






17. Total separations (sums of items 11 to 16 inclusive) . 


100 


104 






Number on Books at end of Year: 

18. In institution . . 


43 
163 


42 


19. Outside institution 


230 






20. Total number end of year (sum of 18 and 19).. . 


206 


272 






21. Sum of items 17 and 20 


306 


376 






22. Less: (Items duplicated in numbers 11-14-15 and in 19) 

First paroles 


83 
1 
1 


67 


Deaths 




Transfers to other institutions.. . . 








Total duplications. .. . 


85 


67 






23. Item 21 less item 22 (same as item 10) 


221 


309 


Average daily resident population during year . 


52 
60 


46 


Normal capacity 


60 







14 



Biennial Report for 1932-33—1933-34 



TABLE NO. 3 
ESTIMATES OF THE AMOUNTS REQUIRED FOR MAINTENANCE FOR THE BIENNIUM 1935-1936-1937 



PURPOSES AND OBJECTS 



Expenditures 1933-1935 
(for Comparison) 



Actual 
1933-1934 



Estimated 
1934-1935 



Requested for 
1935-1937 



Estimated 
1935-1936 



Estimated 
1936-1937 



1. Administration: 

Board meetings 

Salary — Superintendent. 

Salary^-Secretary 

Office supplies 

Postage 

Telephone and telegraph. 

Travel expense 

Printing 

Bonding 

Parole work 



1,500.00 
480.00 
33.00 
69.00 
153.00 
10.00 
20.00 
14.00 



125.00 
1,500.00 

480.00 
40.00 
75.00 

125.00 
50.00 
50.00 
25.00 



100.00 

1,800.00 

720.00 

100.00 

100.00 

200.00 

150.00 

200.00 

25.00 

1,500.00 



100.00 

1,800.00 

720.00 

100.00 

100.00 

200.00 

150.00 

200.00 

25.00 

1,500.00 



$ 2,279.00 



2. Custodial care: 

Salaries and wages '.. 

Food 

Supplies 

Equipment 

Wearing apparel 

Medical, surgical, dental 

Salary — Farm director 

Wages — Farm hands 

Feed and forage 

Farm supplies 

Farm equipment 

Fertilizer 

Parolees and runaways — 



3 . Operation and maintenance of plant: 

Fuel 

Supplies 

Motor vehicle operation 

Repairs and alterations 

Insurance 

Electric current 

Grounds 

4 . Additions and betterments 

Total 



2,397 

2,066 

361 

194 

385 

852 

840 

316 

439 

209 

193 

98 

71 



.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 



$ 2,470.00 



2,400.00 
1,900.00 
350.00 
300.00 
410.00 
650.00 
840.00 
240.00 
450.00 
220.00 
200.00 
350.00 
100.00 



$ 4,895.00 



3,600.00 

2,800.00 
500.00 

1,000.00 
600.00 

2,000.00 
960.00 
750.00 
800.00 
400.00 
600.00 

1,000.00 
75.00 



$ 4,895.00 



3,600.00 

2,800.00 
500.00 

1,000.00 
600.00 

2,000.00 
960.00 
750.00 
800.00 
400.00 
600.00 

1,000.00 
75.00 



$ 8,421.00 



413.00 
50.00 
496.00 
300.00 
370.00 
474.00 
6.00 



$ 8 ; 410.00 



300.00 
110.00 
450.00 
600.00 
480.00 
480.00 
50.00 



$ 15,085.00 



1,000.00 
110.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
530.00 
600.00 
100.00 



$ 15,085.00 



2,000.00 
110.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
530.00 
600.00 
100.00 



$ 2,109.00 
$ 706.00 



$ 2,470.00 
$ 610.00 



$ 4,340.00 
$ 2,000.00 



$ 5,340.00 
$ 2,000.00 



$ 13,515.00 



$ 13,960.00 



$ 26,320.00 



$ 27,320.00 



INDUSTRIAL FARM COLONY FOR WOMEN 

KINSTON, N. C. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



FOR THE TWO FISCAL YEARS ENDED 
JUNE 30, 1933, AND JUNE 30, 1934 



16 



Biennial Report for 1932-33—1933-34 



EXHIBIT "A" 

Revenues and Expenditures 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT FUND 

For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1933 and 1934 



Fiscal Year 
1932-1933 



Fiscal Year 
1933-1934 



REVENUES 

Unexpended balance, June 30, 1932 

Unexpended balance, June 30, 1933 

EXPENDITURES 

Potato house 

Unexpended balance, June 30 



$ 610.82 



110.82 



500.00 



110.82 



110.82 



EXHIBIT "B" 

Revenues and Expenditures 

MAINTENANCE FUND 

For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1933 and 1934 



REVENUES 



Appropriations: 

Chapter 429, P. L. 1931. 
Chapter 282, P. L. 1933. 
Institutional receipts 



Total revenues . 



EXPENDITURES 

Administration 

Custodial care 

Operation and maintenance of plant 

Additions and betterments 



Total expenditures 

Balance reverted to General Fund. 



Fiscal Year 
1932-1933 



$ 19,200.00 
44.05 



$ 19,244.05 



2,471.32 
7,961.19 
2,227.74 



$ 12,660.25 



$ 6,583.80 



Fiscal Year 
1933-1934 



$ 13,210.00 
308.83 



$ 



13,518.83 



2,279.08 

8,420.61 

2,109.31 

705.83 



$ 13,514.83 



4.00 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



17 



EXHIBIT "C" 
AVERAGE POPULATION AND MAINTENANCE PER CAPITA COST 
For the Two Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1933 and 1934 



Function 


Fiscal Year 
1932-1933 


Fiscal Year 
1933-1934 


Administration 


$ 


46.98 

151.36 

42.35 


$ 


49.39 


Custodial care 


182.51 


Operation and maintenance of plant 


45.72 


Additions and betterments .. - - 


15.29 








Total --. 


$ 


240.69 


1 


292.91 


Average number of inmates - - - 


52.6 




46.14 







EXHIBIT "D" 
Statement of Institutional Receipts 
MAINTENANCE FUND 
For the Two Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1933 and 1934 



Fiscal Year 
1932-1933 



Fiscal Year 
1933-1934 




County refunds: 

Board 

Medicine and travel 

Parolee fare 

Sale of farm products. -- 
Other refunds 

Total 



308.83 



18 



Biennial Report for 1932-33—1933-34 



FARM PRODUCTS USED BY THE INSTITUTION 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1933 and 1934 



Year 1932-1933 



Year 1933-1934 



Milk 

Butter 

Chickens 

Eggs. 

Turkeys 

Beets 

Butter beans. . 

Cabbage 

Carrots 

Cantaloupes. .. 

Corn 

Collards 

Cucumbers 

Eggplant 

Field peas 

Garden peas... 

Greens 

Okra 

Onions 

Peppers 

• Pork 

Potatoes, Irish 
Potatoes, sweet 

Radishes 

Rape 

Squash. 

String beans. .. 
Strawberries— . 

Tomatoes 

Turnips 

Watermelons ._ 



1,1 69£ gallons 
326* pounds 
819j pounds 



1,254 
50 
18 
33 

1,006 



dozen 

pounds 

bushels 

bushels 

pounds 



If bushels 
1,021 
290 dozen 

17 bushels 

35§ bushels 
7 bushels 

18 bushels 
13 bushels 
13| bushels 
121 bushels 

2,632 pounds 

67i bushels 

195 bushels 

3 J bushels 

43 bushels 
87 bushels 
1 , 398 quarts 
27i bushels 

119 bushels 

823 



1, 297§ gallons 

217 pounds 

522 pounds 

1,103| dozen 

6 bushels 

26 bushels 

1 , 640 pounds 

9 bushels 

75 

135 dozen 

73f bushels 

6 bushels 

313 bushels 

53 bushels 

58 bushels 

6 bushels 

26 bushels 

38 bushels 

450 pounds 

35 bushels 

40 bushels 

If bushels 

32 bushels 

48 bushels 

40 quarts 

56 bushels 

29 bushels 
150 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



19 



CANNING REPORT 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1933 and 1934 





Quarts 
Year 1932-1933 


Quarts 
Year 1933-1934 


Beans, lima..' 


82 

518 

64 

17 

8 

47 
18 

11 
20 

15 

843 

52 
24 
12 

108 

1,019 

47 

11 

120 

24 
183 
20$ 

36 
11 
103 
319 
241 
162 
6 

15* 
91 
2* 


84 


Beans, string 


388 


Bean pickle . 


16 


Beets 




Beet pickle 


84 


Blackberry jam 


10 


Cantaloupe pickle . . . 




Cantaloupe preserves -- - - 




Carrots 


56 


Carrot pickle 


18 


Chili sauce 




Chicken . _ 




Chow-chow 


37 


Corn 




Corn relish ... 




Cucumber pickle 


22 


Cucumbers _ 




Cucumber relish 


13 


Dewberries . 




Fruit juice 


72 


Grape jam ... 




Greens . __ ... 




Green tomato pickle . 




Kraut.. . 


184 


Kraut juice __ 


10 


Okra 


33 


Okra-tomatoes 


25 


Peaches . 


342 


Peach jam 


54* 
57 


Peach pickle 


Pears.. 


116 


Pear preserves 


10 


Pear pickle 


12 


Pepper relish 


136 


Peas 


23 


Soup mixture 




Squash 


356 


Strawberry jam ... 




Tomatoes. .. . 


82 


Tomato sauce . 




Watermelon preserves . 




Watermelon pickle _ 


122 


Watermelon relish . . 


23 






Total.. 


4,250* 


2,385* 





I 




Date Due 


mnH', 


,m 






























































































































BRODART. INC Cat No 23 233 Printed in U S A